Trump Travel Ban, Part Infinity: Yossarian Edition

I wrote earlier this week about how the Ninth Circuit’s ruling on the travel ban would affect the proceedings in the Supreme Court. When discussing the narrowing of the injunction to permit the White House to conduct an internal review of visa screening procedures, I argued that it would now be incumbent on the Trump Administration to promptly commence such a review or else risk blowing up the facial raison d’être for the ban. I still believe that to be true. However, after reading subsequent filings by the parties in the Supreme Court and commentary regarding same, I have realized that the narrowing of the injunction places the White House in a much bigger pickle than I initially believed.

As background, Trump’s stated reason for the original 90 day travel ban and its successor EO was that the White House needed to conduct a review of visa vetting procedures. In a well-reasoned tweetstorm, the indispensable and increasingly omnipresent Steve Vladeck aptly explained the government’s stated reason for the ban: “the travel/entry ban was not an end unto itself, but a means to help carry out the real goal of the EO: new vetting rules.” (Yes, I just quoted a tweet, but that seems perfectly legitimate given the subject matter. The Ninth Circuit says they’re admissible now.)

While the original ban itself was enjoined by the Western District of Washington before it ever began, the review process was not, and the White House remained free to conduct such a review. Once a new travel ban was announced, the District of Hawaii then implemented an injunction which not only blocked the ban but also blocked the review process from occurring as well, roughly 45 days after the first EO’s review was to initially begin. As of the Ninth Circuit’s ruling on Monday, however, the DOJ is now free to proceed with the review. As noted above, the Trump Administration needs to begin this review or else it proves that it was merely pretext for the ban. Indeed, today the DOJ has indicated that it will now conduct the review because of the Ninth Circuit’s narrowing of the Hawaii injunction.

However, Vladeck pointed out that by conducting the review, the Trump Administration undermines the entire purpose for the ban. If the White House is indeed able to conduct this review process now, then why was the ban ever actually necessary? The whole point was to conduct the process that it is now conducting without such a ban being in place.

This point is compounded by the fact that the DOJ has not asked for expedited argument. This means that the 90-day review period will surely have concluded prior to a decision by the court. At that point, what is the point of the travel ban at all? The ban was to facilitate a review process which will have already concluded by the time the court decides the issue.

Hawaii’s counsel yesterday made a similar point: because more than 90 days have passed since the original EO and nearly 90 days since the second EO, this whole case will be moot by the time it gets to the Supreme Court. While I do not think that this argument holds water especially given the Hawaii stay of the review process, the point is clear: the Supreme Court will be deciding the fate of a travel ban which would have – on its face – already concluded had it been allowed to run its course.

This puts the White House in a Catch-22. If it does not conduct the review, then it risks destroying the stated rationale for the ban. If it does conduct the review and the ninety-day period concludes, then the ban is no longer necessary. The one acceptable middle position would have been to seek expedited argument so that the review would be ongoing at the time of argument, but the DOJ elected not to take this tact.

The DOJ could and likely will argue that while it is conducting its review now, said review will not be fully efficient or effective until a shutdown is implemented. But oral argument may not be until October, nine months after the original ban; can the DOJ credibly argue at that point that its ability to conduct a review which would have taken three months under optimal conditions has been so hamstrung that it couldn’t be completed in nine? I don’t think so.

Vladeck does seem to suggest that the DOJ was simply wrong in commencing the review process, which in turn would mean that the Catch-22 I described above wouldn’t really exist. I disagree. The argument that the White House is conducting a review – albeit a hobbled one – is much stronger than simply doing nothing when it is permitted to act. Conducting the review now, immediately after the Ninth Circuit’s narrowing of the injunction, is the one bit of urgency that the DOJ or White House has expressed during this saga. It makes more sense to argue that it had a national security imperative to begin a flawed review immediately rather than waiting for the Supreme Court to enable an unfettered review many months from now. Regardless, neither way is optimal, and that’s my entire point – the DOJ is now in prime “damned if you do, damned if you don’t” territory.

Finally, this situation is one of the White House and DOJ’s own making. Their stated rationale for the ban was the urgent need to conduct a temporary review of vetting procedures, in the name of national security. That rationale probably doomed the ban from the start, because it lit a ninety-day fuse for the destruction of the ban’s stated usefulness. The White House and DOJ also bungled the rollout, failing to actually conduct such a review in the 45 day window it had, and then repeatedly refusing to take steps to expedite the inevitable path to the Supreme Court. The DOJ’s dilly-dallying – knowing that the clock was ticking until the court’s summer recess, not seeking immediate Supreme Court review, not asking for expedited argument, and then asking in mid-June for a delay in briefing (!) – undermines its own arguments that this is an urgent national security concern.

Ultimately, the White House may still win at the end of the day. But if they do, then it seems likely that such a result was preordained from the start, since neither the White House nor the DOJ has done themselves many favors.

-Ryan

Author: RMLockman

Civil rights attorney. Views expressed are mine only.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s