Anything You Tweet Can and Will Be Used Against You In a Court of Law: POTUS TRAVEL BAN EDITION

A few days ago, the DOJ filed its cert petition and petition for stay in the travel ban case. When the petitions were filed, the general consensus seemed to be that the cert petition would certainly be granted and that the petition for stay had a decent (albeit probably unlikely) shot.

And then Trump tweeted.

Trump’s tweets from today were as follows:

People, the lawyers and the courts can call it whatever they want, but I am calling it what we need and what it is, a TRAVEL BAN!

The Justice Dept. should have stayed with the original Travel Ban, not the watered down, politically correct version they submitted to S.C.

The Justice Dept. should ask for an expedited hearing of the watered down Travel Ban before the Supreme Court – & seek much tougher version!

In any event we are EXTREME VETTING people coming into the U.S. in order to help keep our country safe. The courts are slow and political!

That’s right, we need a TRAVEL BAN for certain DANGEROUS countries, not some politically correct term that won’t help us protect our people!

To understand why today’s tweets were so damaging, we must look to how they affect the biggest sticking points for the respondents. These are (or were): 1) whether or not campaign statements can be used against Trump, and 2) whether the government’s animus from the original ban stains all subsequent versions of it. These two issues created two large fault lines among the judges in the 4th and 9th Circuits at oral argument and in their opinions.

Essentially, as I explained in my initial post, the case likely comes down to a test set forth by the Supreme Court decades ago in a case called Kleindienst v. Mandel and recently reiterated in a  very recent concurring opinion by swing vote Justice Anthony Kennedy in Kerry v. Din. That test requires that government’s immigration decisions be upheld as long as the government can present a “a facially legitimate and bona fide” reason for its decision. There is mostly no question that the travel ban is facially legitimate. The issue then comes to whether the travel ban was done in good faith (bona fide) or out of a bad faith religious animus. That is where Trump’s tweets come in.

To that end, and as I explained above, the dissenting judges in the circuit courts hit hardest on the following points: 1) Trump’s campaign statements should not count, and his actual post-oath-of-office record was not blatantly anti-Muslim, and 2) under the state’s logic, it once bias infects one version of an executive order, there is nothing that an administration could ever do to cure that bias, no matter how objectively legitimate the content of an amended EO. These are two good points, and they force the respondents to attack the EO in its current incarnation and using only Trump’s statements as president. As one of the 4th Circuit dissenting opinions stated, “The Supreme Court has repeatedly warned against judicial psychoanalysis of a drafter’s heart of hearts.” Without the campaign statements, and given the typical levels of executive deference in these contexts, it was a bit difficult to actually pin any of Trump’s statements that specifically and explicitly imbued an anti-muslim bias into the amended travel ban. Rather, the dissenters argued, the court was simply psychoanalyzing Trump’s heart of hearts, and this was improper.

But now those points are gone. Trump’s tweets exhibit his bias as president. Moreover, he makes it clear that he still maintains the bias from the first ban, which he obviously prefers and which was apparently jettisoned by the DOJ, not by Trump himself. Trump still holds the same mindset from the original ban and still wishes to accomplish the same ends. There is no longer a viable argument by the DOJ that the new ban was issued in good faith or that it represented Trump turning a corner. No, it’s clear that Trump signed the new EO kicking and screaming, and that both of the bans were motivated by a politically incorrect intent to ban people from Muslim countries. In other words, this completely undercuts the two best arguments made by the DOJ and the dissenting circuit judges.

Lastly, Trump’s tweets are so damaging because they make him seem dangerously unhinged. They not only threaten the legitimacy of the executive branch, but also that of the Supreme Court if it fails to check Trump’s powers. Although the courts normally grant a high level of deference to the president in the national security and immigration contexts, Trump’s behavior places his presidency – and, in turn, the court’s role in checking its power – in unchartered territory. As Lawfare’s Benjamin Wittes and (today) Jack Goldsmith have stated, Trump no longer enjoys the “presumption of normalcy”, and this certainly applies to the courts. Thus, the Supreme Court may be willing to intercede when it normally would be loathe to do so.

Ultimately, Chief Justice Roberts’ Rules of Order go out the window when faced with the Mad King screaming for wildfire.

  

-Ryan

Author: RMLockman

Civil rights attorney. Views expressed are mine only.

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